News & Events

Speaking Out Media Advocacy Program

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Call Ari on 03 9851 3700 for more information

WHAV Media Release

WHAV Media release – Free from Violence funding announcement

Yesterday the Honorable Natalie Hutchins came to Women’s Health East announced funding for Women’s Health Services!

Read this media release from WHAV, the peak body for Women’s Health Services to learn more.

WHAV Media release – Free from Violence funding announcement

TFER Strategy

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The Together for Equality & Respect Strategy makes clear the case for action in the prevention of violence against women. It explains the causation and the evidence about what we can do to prevent violence before it occurs. Building on this knowledge, and developed through a collaborative and consultative process, Together for Equality & Respect provides us with a vision for the future of the Eastern Metropolitan Region, and some directions for how we can achieve this vision together.

We are pleased to have recently launched the Together for Equality & Respect Strategy 2017-2021.

Click here to read the strategy. For more information on Together For Equality and Respect visit the website. 

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No Limitations Guide Launch!

No Limitations – Breaking down gender stereotypes in the early years. A guide for early years educators (WHE 2017). 

The No Limitations Guide has been developed for early childhood educators to promote gender equality in early childhood settings. It provides practical tools, tips and resources for early educators for both an organisational focus and working with families. It is also useful for parents and families, and anyone working with young children. You can download the guide and other useful resources here

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How to get involved in #GE4Us

How to get started:

 A number of helpful resources have been provided to make your involvement in the campaign easy.

  • A 16 Days daily #GE4Us messages guide for you to use as you wish! Share the campaign messages on social media, use them as your e-signature, promote them on your website or print them out to display.
  • ‘About the Campaign’ and ‘Background Fact Sheets’ to orient you with the #GE4Us campaign, the 16 Days of Activism campaign, along with information about violence against women, gender inequality and why the campaign is important in achieving equality.
  • A campaign activity for you to share your own #GE4Us messages, or invite some community members to do so.
  • Simple steps on how to evaluate your social marketing campaign.
  • A campaign poster – which you can request through the contact details below, or print you own.

CLICK HERE TO CONTINUE TO THE RESOURCES PAGE

Who do I contact for more information?

If you have any questions about the campaign, please contact Jayde at Women’s Health East – 9851 3700 / jmcburnie@whe.org.au

16 Days of Activism Against Gender Based Violence

WHAT IS THE 16 DAYS OF ACTIVISM AGAINST GENDER BASED VIOLENCE?

 The 16 Days of Activism Against Gender Based Violence (16 Days) is a global campaign to raise awareness about violence against women and its impact on a woman’s physical, psychological, social and spiritual well-being. The 16 Days begin on 25th November, the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women, and end on December 10th, International Human Rights Day. These dates were chosen to highlight that violence against women is a human rights abuse. (Click here to read more about the significant events during the 16 Days). 

During the 16 Days people from around the world use the campaign to raise awareness about the prevalence and devastating impact of violence against women, to celebrate victories gained, to challenge the structures that enable and support violence against women to occur at such an alarming rate, and to demand that violence against women be recognised as an abuse of human rights.

Click here to read more about the origins of the 16 Days of Activism Campaign. 

VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN 

Intimate partner violence is the leading cause of death, disability and illness in Australian women aged 18-44 years. Violence against women has profound, wide ranging, long term impacts on the health and wellbeing of women and children, families and communities. Three in ten Australian women report having experienced physical violence at least once in their lives, and two in ten women report having experienced sexual violence at least once in their lives. Almost one woman each week is killed by a current or former partner. In 2015-16 Victoria Police attended almost 24 family violence incidents each day in the Eastern Metropolitan Region .

Women’s Health East work towards ending violence against women in the Eastern Metropolitan Region by addressing the underlying determinants of violence against women, which are centred around power and gender inequality. We do this through working in partnership with other organisations in a coordinated approach, through advocacy and research, and by implementing primary prevention programs. Take a look at Together for Equality & Respect, the Speaking Out program and LGBTI Family Violence Prevention Project; three examples of how Women’s Health East is working towards preventing violence against women in Melbourne’s East.

For more information on this priority area check out our Resources and see the topic Violence Against Women.

WHAT IS GENDER EQUALITY?

Inequality between men and women can take many forms. Inequality in power, resources, and entitlements, as well as historical norms and values around the roles of women in society, negatively impact the health of girls and women. The ways in which organisations are structured and programmes are run can similarly have a negative impact on the health of girls and women. Inequality between women and men can also affect women’s capacity to access resources such as income, education and employment, which themselves promote health.

To address these inequalities, Women’s Health East advocate for a gender equity approach to health. This approach acknowledges that men and women do not function on a level playing field and, as a result, the health of women is impacted. To account for this, different strategies and measures must be implemented for men and women in order to create fair outcomes. For example, increasing the representation of women in organisational leadership roles and positions of power can help to shift cultural norms around gender roles, and gives women the opportunity to have input into decision making that affects their 
lives and the lives of other women in their community.

WHY IS GENDER EQUALITY SO IMPORTANT IN ORDER TO END VIOLENCE?

There is a strong link between violence against women and the ingrained inequalities between men and women.[v] Research has shown a strong association between sexist attitudes, the unequal status of women in society and the perpetration of violence against women, which is why the message of gender equality in the 16 Days campaign is so important.

Gender inequality can also lead to depression and anxiety,[vi] low self-esteem and body image issues,[vii],[viii] financial exclusion, poor health literacy[ix] and poverty, which in turn can lead to a higher exposure to risk factors for poor health and higher prevalence of chronic diseases including heart disease, cancer, liver disease, respiratory disease and Type 2 Diabetes.[x],[xi],[xii],[xiii

References

#GE4Us

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16 Days of Activism against Gender Based Violence Campaign 2017

 

Learn more about the 16 Days of Activism Against Gender Based Violence

See how to get involved

Use our GE4Us campaign resources

Read our GE4Us Ambassador Stories

 

The 16 Days of Activism against Gender Based Violence (16 Days) is a global campaign to raise awareness about violence against women and its impact on a woman’s physical, psychological, social and spiritual well-being. The 16 Days begin on 25th November, the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women, and end on December 10th, International Human Rights Day. These dates were chosen to highlight that violence against women is a human rights abuse. 

The Eastern Metro Campaign 2017

As the fundamental driver of violence against women is gender inequality, Women’s Health East are leading a regional campaign to promote Gender Equality. #GE4Us (Gender Equality For Us) is a social marketing campaign designed with support from local councils to coincide with the global 16 Days campaign. The campaign focuses on what gender equality looks like in everyday life by featuring community Ambassadors from Melbourne’s Eastern Metropolitan Region.

It also encourages other members of the community across the region to think about what gender equality means to them! In order to achieve gender equality, we must recognise that gender inequality affects us all, regardless of our age, ability, gender or culture. By participating in the #GE4Us campaign, you can help to spread the #GE4Us message. You can also add your voice to the public conversation about gender equality. Sharing your own message about what gender equality means to you and your family, colleagues, and/or friends (via social media or other avenues) can help encourage others in the community to stop and think about examples from their own lives.

By raising awareness of why gender equality is important we can help shift the conversation to action to achieve gender equality.

Voices for Change

VOICES FOR CHANGE

A guide to implementing a media advocacy program for the prevention of violence against women.

Violence against women happens in every community, suburb and town, and the voices of survivors need to be heard if we are to end violence against women. A media advocacy program enables women who have experienced violence to share their stories with the public through the media and other community advocacy engagements.

Building on our expertise in leading the Speaking Out program, Women’s Health East was engaged by Our Watch and VicHealth to develop Voices for Change.

Voices for Change: A Media Advocacy Program for the Prevention of Violence Against Women is a step-by-step guide with resources to enable organisations to plan and develop their own Media Advocacy Program with one unequivocal goal: to end violence against women.

Voices for Change is comprised on two essential documents – an Implementation Guide and Facilitator Training Manual.

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The Voices for Change Implementation Guide shares the practical experience of organisations in Australia that have pioneered media advocacy work. It outlines how to establish a Media Advocacy Program that can be shaped to your organisation, with women who have different experiences of violence.

Click on the relevant sections to download and read, or alternatively, download the full guide including appendices/resources.

Voices for Change Implementation Guide – full version

Section 1: Introduction

Section 2: History and current context

Section 3: Why media advocacy?

Section 4: Is media advocacy for you?

Section 5: Program planning

Section 6: Working with advocates

Section 7: Creating and managing media advocacy opportunities

Section 8: Appendices

170620 FacilitatorManual_PicTraining Manual

A companion resource to the Implementation Guide is the Voices for Change Facilitator Training Manual on how to run media advocacy training sessions with women who have experienced family violence or sexual assault. It includes practical tools and resources that can be used as a part of the training sessions.

If you would like a copy of the Voices for Change Facilitator Training Manual, please contact Kristine Olaris on 9851 3700 or kolaris@whe.org.au

Women’s Sexual and Reproductive Health: Key Priorities 2017-2020

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Following consultations with sexual and reproductive health service providers and advocates, the state government has just released Women’s Sexual and Reproductive Health: Key Priorities 2017-2020.  The strategy, together with $6.6 million in new funding, is a step towards ensuring that all Victorian women, regardless of where they live and how much money they have, are given access to the sexual and reproductive health services and support they need.

The Strategy identifies four key priority areas for improvement including:

– Equitable access to high quality contraception and pregnancy termination services and information

– treatment and management of endometriosis, polycystic ovary syndrome and menopause

– fertility and conception awareness, and

– prevention and treatment of sexually transmitted infections.

Royal Commission into Family Violence

 

On Wednesday 30 March 2016 the Victorian Royal Commission into Family Violence handed down it’s report and 227 recommendations to the Victorian Government. You can view our response to the report in the Media Release below, and our submission to the Royal Commission.

 

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